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Sunday, May 27, 2018

The 1929 Grand Banks earthquake

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 24, 2015

At about 5:02 pm on Monday, November 18, 1929, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck beneath the Laurentian Continental Slope about 250 miles south of the island of Newfoundland. The water there is about 7,000 feet deep. The earthquake was felt as far away as New York, Bermuda, and Montreal.

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Turkey

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Turkey Inspection in Turkey/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Turkey, Countries. Dr Capt.

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Vietnam

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 29, 2014

Vietnam Inspection in Vietnam/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/ Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/ Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Vietnam, Countries. Dr Capt.

Gulf States Shipbuilders Consortium Tackles Big Issues

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 3, 2014

I want to start out by thanking Audrey (Kennedy) for inviting me to speak to you this afternoon. It’s a privilege to do so, especially with an audience representing such an important part of the domestic waterfront, and at a time when much of…

Albatross

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2012

The albatross is the largest of all birds in terms of wingspan (up to 12 feet). It can be found soaring above all ocean waters of the Southern Hemisphere and above the North Pacific. It is largely absent from the North Atlantic, probably due to loss of habitat.

Preventing Accidents due to Human Errors thru Ergonomic design

Posted to Preventing Accidents due to Human Errors thru Ergonomic design (by Joseph Fonseca) on August 13, 2012

Regulations and systems have not achieved the desired effects in averting marine accidents which are a result of human errors and account for 80 per cent of those occurring worldwide. The implementation of the International Safety Management…

USCG Waives Maritime Security Regulations for Some Facilities

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on July 26, 2011

The US Coast has just issued MTSA Policy Advisory Council Decision 02-11 (PAC 02-11), “Waiving Facilities that Transfer Certain Low Risk Commodities.”  Owners/operators of MTSA-regulated facilities that transfer or store bulk commodities that are listed in the Decision as being low risk can…

Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer

Posted to Anglo Eastern innovate Advance Process Instrumentation Trainer (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 4, 2011

Since simulators, ship-in-campus and other systems have their limitation for imparting training to marine engineers in some of the advanced areas Anglo Eastern Maritime Training Center has come up with an innovation for imparting training to…

Excursion vessels in polar waters

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 11, 2014

The world was recently witness to a multi-national effort to rescue the Russian excursion vessel Akademik Shokalskiy after it was beset in wind-driven ice off the coast of Antarctica. The French supply vessel L’Astrolabe turned back from its relief effort.

Chowgule’s ship-lift fast becoming a reality

Posted to Chowgule’s ship-lift fast becoming a reality (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 8, 2014

Mid-way between Mumbai and Goa on the West coast of India, a new ship-lift facility being constructed by the Chowgule group, is fast becoming a reality. Situated adjacent to the group’s Angre Port, the repair yard will have the capacity to handle six ships simultaneously of up to 10…

The power play starts at Los Angeles

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 26, 2013

When a minor cog in a political machine starts asking whether jobs will be lost at a port because of the drive for greater efficiency, you know there are real problems ahead. That in essence is the situation facing Los Angeles following the…

Size counts on weak Asia-Europe routes

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 19, 2013

The mega vessel sharing agreement between the world’s three biggest container lines is going to completely dominate Asia-Europe trade with ships from Maersk, MSC and CMA CGM having a good 40 percent share of the market. The P3 Network, as it is called…

TWIC: Alive and Kicking

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on May 22, 2013

The way forward for homeland security officials seems to be pretty clear when it comes to the much anticipated and often criticized Transportation Worker Identification Card (TWIC). Or maybe not. The U.S. Government Accounting Office (GAO) report…

MLC set to brighten up the seafaring career

Posted to MLC set to brighten up the seafaring career (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 29, 2012

Set to bring back the lost glory of seafaring, the Maritime Labor Convention 2006 (MLC) which will come into force on 20 August 2013, is expected to not only provide  comprehensive rights and protection at work for the seafarers but is also…

Drive to cut costs may push shipping into the clouds

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on September 21, 2012

Maersk Line recently signed a US$150 million cloud computing deal with HP. In the five-year agreement, the Danish carrier will use HP’s cloud-enabled data centers and HP Workplace Services in what is known as an “instant-on enterprise”. Yes, that made no sense to me, either.

Chinese research icebreaker Xue Long

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 25, 2012

The Xue Long (Snow Dragon) is the premier polar vessel of the People’s Republic of China. It was built in the Ukraine in 1993 and modified upon its acquisition by China in 1994. Its major function is to serve as a resupply vessel and scientific research platform in the Antarctic and the Arctic.

Yangtze shipping left high and dry

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 25, 2012

The Year of the Dragon begins now, represented in the Chinese zodiac by the Water Dragon. There is some irony in that, because the worst drought in 50 years has forced Chinese maritime authorities to close the Yangtze River above the port of Wuhan, more than 600 miles upriver from Shanghai.

Henry Hudson

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2011

Little is known of Henry Hudson prior to 1607, when he was hired by the Muscovy Company of the Kingdom of England to find a northern route to the Far East. He and a crew of ten sailed on the 80-ton Hopewell. They reached the east coast of Greenland and traveled north to the ice pack.

Part 2 of: Establishing an On-Line Trainer Community for Your Maritime Organization

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on November 2, 2011

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.Part 2 of 3:  Establishing…

The Train Wreck at DOT

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on October 19, 2011

It has been an interesting autumn at the U.S. Maritime Administration and for its Department of Transportation parent, as well. Little in the way of good news is to be had for anyone; much less the U.S. domestic waterfront itself. The abrupt…