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Wednesday, August 21, 2019

The 1929 Grand Banks earthquake

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 24, 2015

At about 5:02 pm on Monday, November 18, 1929, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck beneath the Laurentian Continental Slope about 250 miles south of the island of Newfoundland. The water there is about 7,000 feet deep. The earthquake was felt as far away as New York, Bermuda, and Montreal.

New Siberian Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 6, 2015

The archipelago called the New Siberian Islands is not new, having existed for eons and containing fossils from the Late Pleistocene (over 100,000 years ago) and probably earlier. Bedrock on the islands is significantly older. The archipelago is comprised of three groups of islands.

Three for the Money (Yours)

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on February 13, 2013

This week, I was at a loss for what to write in this column until I saw a little snippet advising that the U.S. Coast Guard was trying its hand at the new, so far mostly mysterious Maritime Labor Convention (2006). And, that’s what they are supposed to do.

Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration?

Posted to Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration? (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 16, 2012

The Government of India is mulling over the idea of handing over the statutory functions of the Indian Administration (Directorate General of Shipping) to the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard. As a beginning, the two agencies are likely to begin…

Malacca

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2014

The Strait of Malacca is named after Malacca, now part of Malaysia. In about the year 1400, Parameswana, the last Raja of Singapura, was expelled from the area around present-day Singapore by local rivals. He relocated to the fishing village of Malacca…

Gulf States Shipbuilders Consortium Tackles Big Issues

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 3, 2014

I want to start out by thanking Audrey (Kennedy) for inviting me to speak to you this afternoon. It’s a privilege to do so, especially with an audience representing such an important part of the domestic waterfront, and at a time when much of…

Dozen more China FTZs a waste of effort

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 28, 2014

China will have 12 free trade zones, Beijing announced a couple of weeks ago. Interesting, considering that Shanghai can’t even explain exactly what its own highly publicised free trade zone will be doing. So far it is all hot air and hyperbole…

Russian Maritime Border Guard

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 30, 2013

The Russian Maritime Border Guard is part of the Russian Border Guard Service, which is part of the Federal Security Service of Russia. The Federal Security Service is the successor to the Soviet KGB, which collapsed with the rest of the Soviet Government in 1991.

Barents Sea

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 21, 2013

The Barents Sea is named for the Dutch navigator, cartographer, and explorer Willem Barents, who mapped the area during expeditions in the late 1500’s. Historically, the Russians referred to it as the Sea of Murmans. It is located north of eastern Norway and western Russia.

Carriers in for a brutal year as capacity floods in

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 4, 2012

Alphaliner’s chart of the week focuses on the new tonnage that has been added by the top 20 container shipping lines in the past 12 months. As incredible as the capacity is – 844,000 TEUs for a fleet growth of 6.4 percent – the one carrier that stands out is CSAV.

Casualty investigation in the eNav era

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 22, 2012

In olden days, investigation of marine casualties relied heavily on the experience of the investigating officer. Statements of witnesses, who were almost always interested parties, were incomplete, self-serving, and often contradictory. Even…