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Friday, December 13, 2019

The 1929 Grand Banks earthquake

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 24, 2015

At about 5:02 pm on Monday, November 18, 1929, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck beneath the Laurentian Continental Slope about 250 miles south of the island of Newfoundland. The water there is about 7,000 feet deep. The earthquake was felt as far away as New York, Bermuda, and Montreal.

New Siberian Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 6, 2015

The archipelago called the New Siberian Islands is not new, having existed for eons and containing fossils from the Late Pleistocene (over 100,000 years ago) and probably earlier. Bedrock on the islands is significantly older. The archipelago is comprised of three groups of islands.

HMS Endeavour

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 2, 2014

The bark HMS Endeavour was built in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke. A type known locally as a Whitby Cat, it had a broad, flat bow, a square stern, a long box-like body with a deep hold, and a flat bottom. Originally ship-rigged, it was…

Malacca

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2014

The Strait of Malacca is named after Malacca, now part of Malaysia. In about the year 1400, Parameswana, the last Raja of Singapura, was expelled from the area around present-day Singapore by local rivals. He relocated to the fishing village of Malacca…

Dozen more China FTZs a waste of effort

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 28, 2014

China will have 12 free trade zones, Beijing announced a couple of weeks ago. Interesting, considering that Shanghai can’t even explain exactly what its own highly publicised free trade zone will be doing. So far it is all hot air and hyperbole…

The new normal for the Jones Act -- big profits?

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 30, 2013

There’s been a new twist to the Jones Act, sending another signal that it’s time for change. Money crunchers are making a huge profit from the artificial market in the domestic oil trade. ExxonMobil has chartered the Overseas Cascade at $110…

Cocos (Keeling) Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 15, 2013

The island group, consisting of two atolls and about 27 coral islands, was stumbled upon by Captain William Keeling (1578-1620) of the East Indiaman Susanna. In 1609, he was returning to England from the East India Company’s trading post on Java.

Russian Maritime Border Guard

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 30, 2013

The Russian Maritime Border Guard is part of the Russian Border Guard Service, which is part of the Federal Security Service of Russia. The Federal Security Service is the successor to the Soviet KGB, which collapsed with the rest of the Soviet Government in 1991.

Barents Sea

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 21, 2013

The Barents Sea is named for the Dutch navigator, cartographer, and explorer Willem Barents, who mapped the area during expeditions in the late 1500’s. Historically, the Russians referred to it as the Sea of Murmans. It is located north of eastern Norway and western Russia.

European discovery of Florida

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 2, 2013

On 2 April 1513 (500 years ago, for those who have lost count), a fleet of three Spanish ships commanded by Juan Ponce de León sighted land west of the Bahamas. He believed it to be another island and named it La Florida (the Flowery Isles) in recognition of its verdant landscape.

London Gateway gets its marketing machine moving

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on November 15, 2012

There is a map produced by London Gateway that draws a line through England from just above the Thames estuary to just north of Liverpool. South of the line is the area claimed by London Gateway where is maintains 78 percent of the market lies.

Student-Centered Learning - a Consideration for all Maritime Trainers

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on July 16, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Maritime Mentoring: International Maritime Mentoring Community - Find a Mentor…

Henry Hudson

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2011

Little is known of Henry Hudson prior to 1607, when he was hired by the Muscovy Company of the Kingdom of England to find a northern route to the Far East. He and a crew of ten sailed on the 80-ton Hopewell. They reached the east coast of Greenland and traveled north to the ice pack.

The Train Wreck at DOT

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on October 19, 2011

It has been an interesting autumn at the U.S. Maritime Administration and for its Department of Transportation parent, as well. Little in the way of good news is to be had for anyone; much less the U.S. domestic waterfront itself. The abrupt…

Pipavav Shipyard set to deliver their first vessel

Posted to Pipavav Shipyard set to deliver their first vessel (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 12, 2011

After some hiccups Pipavav Defence and Offshore Engineering Company Limited will finally be giving delivery of their first vessel later this month. India’s largest shipyard at the Gulf of Cambay in Gujarat on the West coast has been flush with…

USS Princeton

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 30, 2011

The frigate USS Princeton, launched in 1843, was named after Princeton, New Jersey, site of an American victory during the Revolutionary War. The city was also the home of the prominent Stockton family, avid supporters of the project to build the vessel.

Spratly war a bad idea, especially for Vietnam

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 16, 2011

In this case, a string of islands. The remote, rocky and barely habitable Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Less than two square miles of islands scattered over 165,000 square miles of ocean. WTF, as my kids say. The Spratlys are claimed by China…

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

Carriers warn Vale's big bulkers will dampen rates

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on December 9, 2010

The dry bulk shipping business is going through a tough time. It is an incredible 80 percent down on the market peak in May 2008, and rates have led carrier operators on a wild and volatile ride ever since. The industry is currently oversupplied with bulk carriers…

Logistics and Workforce Problems Plaguing Brazil´s O&G Development

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on November 10, 2010

Petrobras was recently upgraded to being the fourth largest energy company in the world, mostly due to the pre-salt fields and there is little doubt in the market that the company can continue climbing this ladder, possibly to the very top, in another decade.
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