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Wednesday, August 21, 2019

5 Types of Container Weighing Systems for Ports and Terminals

Posted to Kevin Hill's Blog (by Kevin HIll) on July 17, 2017

Every port and terminal facility needs weighing systems for containers. Weighing is critical in several processes in ports where accurate readings are paramount. To achieve this, the following weighing solutions can be incorporated. 1. WeighbridgesWeighbridges…

The 1929 Grand Banks earthquake

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 24, 2015

At about 5:02 pm on Monday, November 18, 1929, a 7.2 magnitude earthquake struck beneath the Laurentian Continental Slope about 250 miles south of the island of Newfoundland. The water there is about 7,000 feet deep. The earthquake was felt as far away as New York, Bermuda, and Montreal.

Elephant seal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 1, 2014

Elephant seals are large seals represented by two species, the northern elephant seal and the southern elephant seal. Both were hunted to near extinction through the end of the nineteenth century. The smaller northern elephant seal is found in the eastern portion of the North Pacific Ocean…

TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role

Posted to TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 9, 2013

Facing all round flak the government has finally decided curtailing the tariff fixing function of the Tariff Authority for Major Ports (TAMP). This was one of the major decisions taken at the 14 Maritime States Development Council (MSDC) meeting of 8 January 2013. The Union Shipping Minister G.

Surveyors, Marine Cargo

Posted to Marine Surveys n Cargo Inspections (by 1. MARINE SURVEY AND CARGO INSPECTION COMPANY IN VIETNAM) on October 2, 2012

What our marine & cargo surveys are?: Our Vietnam marine & cargo surveys are providing services of hull, marine cargo surveys & port loading and unloading supervision and consultant, cargo claims, inspections & loss control carried out by our Vietnamese independent marine surveyors…

Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration?

Posted to Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration? (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 16, 2012

The Government of India is mulling over the idea of handing over the statutory functions of the Indian Administration (Directorate General of Shipping) to the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard. As a beginning, the two agencies are likely to begin…

McMurdo Sound

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 14, 2014

McMurdo Sound (approximately 35 miles long and 30 miles wide) connects the Ross Sea to the north to the Ross Ice Shelf on the coast of Antarctica due south of New Zealand. This body of water, frequently ice-covered, was discovered by Captain…

BIO Hesperides

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 16, 2013

The BIO Hesperides (A-33) is an ice-strengthened oceanographic vessel of the Spanish Navy. It is named for the nymphs in Greek mythology believed to tend a blissful garden in a far western corner of the world on the shore of the Oceanus. The ship, built in Cartagena, Spain, was commissioned in 1991.

Gjøa

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 10, 2012

The Gjøa is a 70-foot long, 48-ton sloop with a 13 horsepower marine paraffin auxiliary engine powering its single screw. It was built in 1872 (without the engine or screw) by Kurt Skaale, who named it for his wife. The vessel was used in the…

Long Beach stands toe-to-toe with its bigger neighbor

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on June 28, 2012

A dramatic shift in financial bulk is taking place at the two main Southern Californian ports over the next 18 months. For the first time, Long Beach will be looking its neighbor, Los Angeles, in the eye. The two ports are standing virtually…

Marad’s Crown Jewel: v2 – a work in progress…

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 14, 2011

You have to ask yourself – what’s the hurry? The urgency with which the U.S. Department of Transportation and its usually ineffective Maritime Administration seem to be intent on reinventing the wheel on the campus of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy is simply breathtaking.

Seafarers and Shore Leave:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on November 16, 2011

The romance is gone. By 1986, it was all but missing from (my) equation of going to sea for a living. That said, and when I joined my first seagoing assignment in the steamy summer of 1980 at the tender age of 21, equipped only with an untested…

Spratly war a bad idea, especially for Vietnam

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 16, 2011

In this case, a string of islands. The remote, rocky and barely habitable Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Less than two square miles of islands scattered over 165,000 square miles of ocean. WTF, as my kids say. The Spratlys are claimed by China…

Indian Budget gives big Boost to coastal shipping

Posted to Indian Budget gives big Boost to coastal shipping (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 7, 2011

Like the curate’s egg, the Indian fiscal 2012 budget is good in parts. Various players of the maritime sector have expressed both optimism and disappointment over various aspects of the budget pertaining to seaports and the efficient, safe and cost-effective movement of freight.

FORAN V70 launch in India

Posted to FORAN V70 launched in India (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 2, 2011

Another system for the design and production of ships and off-shore platforms will be launched in India close at the heels of NAPPA systems. Popularly known as FORAN V70 it is scheduled to be launched  on 16th February 2011 in Mumbai by the Spanish multinational…

Los Angeles and Gambol Industries Get Closer to the Rocks

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 2, 2010

Bond ratings for the Port of Los Angeles might just be getting a downgrade within the next year, and by extension, so will those for Long Beach. The Gambol Industries shipyard controversy will be the reason. Gambol's objections center on cost…

GlobalMET Charts a new course at India chapter

Posted to GlobalMET Charts a new course at India chapter (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 22, 2010

With focus on charting a new course the Global Maritime Education & Training Association (GlobalMET), which boasts of 106 members based in 35 economies, held its annual conference in Mumbai on 20 November 2010. Held jointly with the Nautical…

Logistics and Workforce Problems Plaguing Brazil´s O&G Development

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on November 10, 2010

Petrobras was recently upgraded to being the fourth largest energy company in the world, mostly due to the pre-salt fields and there is little doubt in the market that the company can continue climbing this ladder, possibly to the very top, in another decade.

SOSUS-VENTS

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 27, 2010

The Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) is a US Navy program, initiated in the early 1950’s, to track Soviet or other potentially hostile submarines. It consists of a series of hydrophones strategically placed on seamounts and continental slopes…

Quantum 2

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on April 20, 2010

The DNV Quantum report also considers many propulsion aspects that were not covered in our previous Quantum report, therefore we call this one Quantum 2. Conventional container ship designs usually go for maximum hull speed requiring highest practicable engine power.
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