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Friday, July 19, 2019

European discovery of Florida

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 2, 2013

On 2 April 1513 (500 years ago, for those who have lost count), a fleet of three Spanish ships commanded by Juan Ponce de León sighted land west of the Bahamas. He believed it to be another island and named it La Florida (the Flowery Isles) in recognition of its verdant landscape.

Market expectations from DNV and GL merger

Posted to Market expectations from DNV and GL merger (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 23, 2013

The recent announcement of the merger of the two classification societies Germanischer Lloyd (GL) and Det Norske Veritas (DNV) seems to have caused an unsettling effect on shipping companies, classification societiesand others related organizations.

China looks inwards as export demand remains weak

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 25, 2012

China became known as the world’s factory by offering manufacturing costs that could not be matched by the developed nations. Its wages paid to uneducated rural migrant labour were a fraction of the mostly unionized pay required in the West, and land for factories was plentiful and cheap.

Right whales

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 17, 2012

There are three species of right whales (four if you include the bowhead whale). These are the North Atlantic right whale, the North Pacific right whale, and the Southern right whale. They acquired the name “right” from whalers, because these whales are commonly found near land and because…

NMSAC Makes Recommendations on Seafarer Shore Access

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on May 20, 2011

The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC) met by teleconference this morning (May 20th) to finalize a Resolution on Seafarer Shore Access. The Resolution was adopted unanimously, after two amendments. One of the maritime transportation…

Salish Sea

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 4, 2011

The Salish Sea extends from the southern end of Puget Sound, near Olympia, Washington, north through Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia to Desolation Sound, and west to where the Strait of Juan de Fuca meets the Pacific Ocean. Its name derives…

Bureau Veritas reported to be buying Inspectorate

Posted to Bureau Veritas reported to be buying Inspectorate (by Claudio Paschoa) on November 20, 2010

The marine fuels testing business has grown greatly over the years in part due to the ever decreasing quality of marine residual fuels and now the regulations with regards to sulphur content and the environment. Competition is keen amongst the major players in the game such as DNVPS…

On Environmental Offices

Posted to We Love Your Ship (by Joseph Wrinn) on June 15, 2010

We create efficient designs, why don’t we work in environmentally friendly offices? As engineers, we always look for ways to improve on our designs. The first improvement in design usually occurs when we can design a more efficient solution to the given problem.

China factories slowly climbing the value chain

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 8, 2011

It may seem we harp on about China’s changing manufacturing industry, but that's because of its direct impact on export ocean cargo and the import of raw materials. All the stuff we consume has to be made somewhere, and the mainland has pretty much cornered the manufacturing market.

Offshore gas & oil ship repairs industry set for a makeover for achieving rapid growth

Posted to Offshore gas & oil ship repairs industry set for a makeover for achieving rapid growth (by Joseph Fonseca) on May 30, 2011

The ship repair opportunities in Indian offshore oil and gas sector remained stagnant for two decades as the industry had been mainly dependent on the public sector infrastructure. With few dedicated large players in the field, the several smaller…

Takeovers on the Pacific route are ahead

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 15, 2011

The list of causes of the collapse of Denmark's The Containership Company makes impressive reading for business school graduates. At latest count there are between eight and 10, depending on one's point of view. Vessel sizes, bunker prices, the Transpacific Stabilization Agreement…

Biofouling

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2011

Biofouling is the accumulation of microorganisms, algae, plants, and/or animals on wetted surfaces, particularly the hulls of ships. This became a significant problem as European mariners started making extended sea voyages in the late fifteenth century.

USCG to Use Flashbangs to Enforce Maritime Security Zones in Puget Sound

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on December 13, 2010

The 13 Coast Guard District has announced that moving maritime security zones in Puget Sound will be enforced with flashbangs fired from shot guns aboard Coast Guard assets escorting high value vessels. The flashbangs will be fired in front…

Surprises are in Store over Shipping Act Maneuvering

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 30, 2010

US maritime politics is getting murkier, who would have thought of it? Just when the straitjacket of antitrust regulation   was about to be wrapped around the  TransPacific Stabilization Agreement, the politicians seemed to be getting ready…