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Friday, December 6, 2019

New Siberian Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 6, 2015

The archipelago called the New Siberian Islands is not new, having existed for eons and containing fossils from the Late Pleistocene (over 100,000 years ago) and probably earlier. Bedrock on the islands is significantly older. The archipelago is comprised of three groups of islands.

Some TWICs Won’t Work in Readers

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on December 6, 2011

Some 26,000 Transportation Worker Identification Credentials (TWICs) may be rejected by TWIC reader machines because of defective encoding. At some point recently, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) posted on the “Latest News”…

Seek Boat Crew Workers

Posted to Crew Workers Wanted (by Cindy Miller) on August 28, 2011

We want to use this medium to inform you that our Cruise company has offer employment opportunities for foreigner. We have jobs opening from restaurant, Office-work, to child care section in London, United Kingdom. Job Salary: This will Depend on your specialization…

Spratly war a bad idea, especially for Vietnam

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 16, 2011

In this case, a string of islands. The remote, rocky and barely habitable Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Less than two square miles of islands scattered over 165,000 square miles of ocean. WTF, as my kids say. The Spratlys are claimed by China…

HMS Endeavour

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 2, 2014

The bark HMS Endeavour was built in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke. A type known locally as a Whitby Cat, it had a broad, flat bow, a square stern, a long box-like body with a deep hold, and a flat bottom. Originally ship-rigged, it was…

Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India

Posted to Vizhinjam to become major transshipment port in S. India (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 29, 2010

Vizhinjam, a port located near the Southern tip of India and close to the international shipping route is being developed into a major transshipment port. Once completed it is expected to attract annually over 10,000 ships that is half the number that pass through the Suez Canal.

Sea otter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 31, 2014

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a member of the weasel family that ran away to sea. It is the smallest of the marine mammals and the only one that does not rely on fat (blubber) for warmth. Rather, it has the thickest coat of fur of any mammal – up to one million strands of hair per square inch.

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Georgia

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Georgia Inspection in Georgia/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Georgia, Countries. Dr Capt.

Malacca

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2014

The Strait of Malacca is named after Malacca, now part of Malaysia. In about the year 1400, Parameswana, the last Raja of Singapura, was expelled from the area around present-day Singapore by local rivals. He relocated to the fishing village of Malacca…

Elephant seal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 1, 2014

Elephant seals are large seals represented by two species, the northern elephant seal and the southern elephant seal. Both were hunted to near extinction through the end of the nineteenth century. The smaller northern elephant seal is found in the eastern portion of the North Pacific Ocean…

The power play starts at Los Angeles

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 26, 2013

When a minor cog in a political machine starts asking whether jobs will be lost at a port because of the drive for greater efficiency, you know there are real problems ahead. That in essence is the situation facing Los Angeles following the…

Ideal X

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 26, 2013

On 26 April 1956, the ship Ideal X departed Port Newark, New Jersey on a voyage to Houston, Texas. The ship had been launched in 1945 as the T-2 tanker SS Potrero Hills. The ship had made many voyages in the intervening eleven years, but this was different.

CG 36500

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 19, 2013

The US Coast Guard motor lifeboat 36500 is the only one of the many hundreds that were built between the 1930s and the 1950s to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. On 18 February 1952, during a severe winter storm off Cape Cod…

S.A. Agulhas II

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 18, 2013

The Agulhas II replaces the older and smaller Agulhas as South Africa’s supply vessel for its scientific and weather stations in Antarctica (SANAE IV located on a rocky outcrop several miles inland in the Queen Maud region); on Marion Island…

TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role

Posted to TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 9, 2013

Facing all round flak the government has finally decided curtailing the tariff fixing function of the Tariff Authority for Major Ports (TAMP). This was one of the major decisions taken at the 14 Maritime States Development Council (MSDC) meeting of 8 January 2013. The Union Shipping Minister G.

India Shipping Summit focuses on positive perspectives and opportunities

Posted to India Shipping Summit focuses on positive perspectives and opportunities (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 15, 2012

Acknowledging the economic downturn that has spread gloom in most spheres of activities, factoring in low key performances and struggles of stakeholders to remain afloat, the recently concluded India Shipping Summit 2012, held last week in Mumbai…

SINKEX

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 31, 2012

The United States Navy disposes of many of its old, obsolete, and decommissioned warships by sinking them in deep ocean waters. This practice, called a sinking exercise or SINKEX, involves removing toxic and hazardous substances to the maximum practicable extent…

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…