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Sunday, May 24, 2020

Marad’s Crown Jewel: v2 – a work in progress…

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 14, 2011

You have to ask yourself – what’s the hurry? The urgency with which the U.S. Department of Transportation and its usually ineffective Maritime Administration seem to be intent on reinventing the wheel on the campus of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy is simply breathtaking.

Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration?

Posted to Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration? (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 16, 2012

The Government of India is mulling over the idea of handing over the statutory functions of the Indian Administration (Directorate General of Shipping) to the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard. As a beginning, the two agencies are likely to begin…

Carriers in for a brutal year as capacity floods in

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 4, 2012

Alphaliner’s chart of the week focuses on the new tonnage that has been added by the top 20 container shipping lines in the past 12 months. As incredible as the capacity is – 844,000 TEUs for a fleet growth of 6.4 percent – the one carrier that stands out is CSAV.

Long Beach stands toe-to-toe with its bigger neighbor

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on June 28, 2012

A dramatic shift in financial bulk is taking place at the two main Southern Californian ports over the next 18 months. For the first time, Long Beach will be looking its neighbor, Los Angeles, in the eye. The two ports are standing virtually…

The Move to Blended Learning in Maritime Training

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on May 21, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.The Move to Blended…

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…

Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched

Posted to Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched (by Joseph Fonseca) on April 30, 2012

In a major development for cargo movement between India and the African continent, the Indo-Africa freight corridor branded, TransAfrica service was launched in Mumbai last fortnight. Promoted jointly by Transocean Express Logistics Pvt Ltd.…

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.

BC Ferries - a Case Study in Blended Maritime Assessment - Part 1

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on April 2, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.IntroductionAssessment in the maritime industry is a huge subject.

Other experimental ironclads

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 23, 2012

When the Union Navy learned that the Confederate Navy was building an iron-clad warship to threaten the wooden-hulled blockade fleet, it launched a crash project to build its own iron-clad warships. Of the 17 proposals submitted, the Union Navy selected three for construction.

Joshua James - Lifesaver

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 16, 2012

Joshua James (1826-1902) served as a lifesaver for 60 of his 75 years. Born in Hull, Massachusetts, he joined the Massachusetts Humane Society (an organization modeled on the Royal National Lifeboat Institution – RNLI) at age 15 after his mother and one of his sisters died in a ship wreck.

Pensacola

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 9, 2011

Pensacola is the westernmost city in Florida, nearly extending into Alabama. It is the homeport for a number of fishing vessels and small passenger vessels. One of its claims to fame is that it is the site of the first European settlement in…

Some TWICs Won’t Work in Readers

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on December 6, 2011

Some 26,000 Transportation Worker Identification Credentials (TWICs) may be rejected by TWIC reader machines because of defective encoding. At some point recently, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) posted on the “Latest News”…

Part 2 of: Establishing an On-Line Trainer Community for Your Maritime Organization

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on November 2, 2011

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.Part 2 of 3:  Establishing…

Alfred Thayer Mahan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 16, 2011

Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914) was born at West Point, where his father was an instructor. After graduating with distinction from the US Naval Academy in 1859, he served blockade duty on a number of warships during the Civil War. Mahan was promoted at…

Seek Boat Crew Workers

Posted to Crew Workers Wanted (by Cindy Miller) on August 28, 2011

We want to use this medium to inform you that our Cruise company has offer employment opportunities for foreigner. We have jobs opening from restaurant, Office-work, to child care section in London, United Kingdom. Job Salary: This will Depend on your specialization…

Spratly war a bad idea, especially for Vietnam

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 16, 2011

In this case, a string of islands. The remote, rocky and barely habitable Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. Less than two square miles of islands scattered over 165,000 square miles of ocean. WTF, as my kids say. The Spratlys are claimed by China…

Georg Wilhelm Steller

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2011

Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709-1746) was a naturalist and zoologist, noted for being the first European to set foot in what is now Alaska and for describing and documenting some of the unique animal life of the region. He was born in Windsheim, Bavaria and studied at the University of Wittenberg.

USCG Waives Maritime Security Regulations for Some Facilities

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on July 26, 2011

The US Coast has just issued MTSA Policy Advisory Council Decision 02-11 (PAC 02-11), “Waiving Facilities that Transfer Certain Low Risk Commodities.”  Owners/operators of MTSA-regulated facilities that transfer or store bulk commodities that are listed in the Decision as being low risk can…

SCI takes delivery of Supermax bulker

Posted to SCI takes delivery of Supermax bulker (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 13, 2011

The state owned Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI), country’s largest shipping company, took delivery of the first of the two Supramax bulk carriers they had contracted for following competitive global tendering process. SCI had selected…