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Saturday, December 7, 2019

Fort Zeelandia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 1, 2013

Once the Dutch decided to compete with the Portuguese and the Spanish for maritime commerce with East Asia, they jumped in with both feet. After establishing a base in Batavia (modern-day Jakarta), they focused on trade with China and Japan.

Cocos (Keeling) Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 15, 2013

The island group, consisting of two atolls and about 27 coral islands, was stumbled upon by Captain William Keeling (1578-1620) of the East Indiaman Susanna. In 1609, he was returning to England from the East India Company’s trading post on Java.

Blues continue for troubled China Cosco

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on November 13, 2013

Don’t leave town, police told an executive director at China Cosco Holdings last week. Okay, they probably never said that, but it doesn’t change the fact that Xu Minjie is under investigation in what is widely believed to be part of Beijing’s crackdown on widespread corruption.

Nordic Orion traverses NWP

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 11, 2013

The Panamanian-flag bulk carrier Nordic Orion was built in Japan in 2011. Managed by Nordic Bulk Carriers A/S of Denmark, the 75,603 DWT vessel carries dry bulk cargoes worldwide. On 6 September 2013, it departed Vancouver, British Columbia…

Upward Falling Payloads

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 24, 2013

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the people who brought you the Internet, is seeking a different method of addressing the worldwide demands of maritime domain awareness in times of crises. While the US Navy is large, its…

Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 3, 2013

During the American Revolutionary War, British forces captured thousands of “rebels”. Those in uniform were accorded treatment somewhat akin to prisoner of war status. Those not in uniform, particularly the maritime privateers, were subjected to harsher conditions.

Talking With the Experts About Maritime Safety Culture - What is it And How to Improve It?

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on September 2, 2013

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

Gloves come off in battle for Britain’s shippers

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on August 13, 2013

The battle for the hearts and minds of shippers has begun as two port-operating giants compete for Britain’s containerised trade. Felixstowe, owned by Hutchison Port Holdings, has been a long established hub and the busiest, and biggest, port in the UK.

Regional Scale Nodes Project

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 9, 2013

The University of Washington is leading the Regional Scale Nodes Project for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Ocean Observatory Initiative. The cabled underwater research facility is being constructed off the Oregon and Washington coasts.

Transhipment business model no good for Hong Kong

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on May 7, 2013

Some ports lend themselves, via geographic location or strategy, to transshipment. Singapore, for instance, had a throughput of 31.6 million TEUs in 2012, but more than 90 percent was comprised of containers in transit. Geographically, Singapore…

Russian Maritime Border Guard

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 30, 2013

The Russian Maritime Border Guard is part of the Russian Border Guard Service, which is part of the Federal Security Service of Russia. The Federal Security Service is the successor to the Soviet KGB, which collapsed with the rest of the Soviet Government in 1991.

Shortsea is sailing under greater power

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on June 30, 2013

Potentially good news for US water-borne commerce. Shortsea shipping is again showing signs of renewed vitality. The first barges on the Stockton to Oakland “Marine Highway” have made their trip, loaded with animal feed. But the project is still the equivalent of a see-saw…

Barents Sea

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 21, 2013

The Barents Sea is named for the Dutch navigator, cartographer, and explorer Willem Barents, who mapped the area during expeditions in the late 1500’s. Historically, the Russians referred to it as the Sea of Murmans. It is located north of eastern Norway and western Russia.

Stad ship tunnel

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 10, 2013

In a move reminiscent of the Athos Canal, built 483-480 BC at the direction of the Persian Emperor Xerxes, or the Corinth Canal, built in the 1890’s by the Greek Government, Norway has tentatively approved construction of a tunnel through the…

Size counts on weak Asia-Europe routes

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 19, 2013

The mega vessel sharing agreement between the world’s three biggest container lines is going to completely dominate Asia-Europe trade with ships from Maersk, MSC and CMA CGM having a good 40 percent share of the market. The P3 Network, as it is called…

TWIC: Alive and Kicking

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on May 22, 2013

The way forward for homeland security officials seems to be pretty clear when it comes to the much anticipated and often criticized Transportation Worker Identification Card (TWIC). Or maybe not. The U.S. Government Accounting Office (GAO) report…

Fracking could be the new future for some ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 28, 2013

Northwest and as the door on a coal terminal closes, another opens for hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Gray’s Harbor, normally associated with autos and breakbulk, is eyeing a huge bonanza in the form of crude-by-rail. The stuff will probably come from the fields…

Ideal X

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 26, 2013

On 26 April 1956, the ship Ideal X departed Port Newark, New Jersey on a voyage to Houston, Texas. The ship had been launched in 1945 as the T-2 tanker SS Potrero Hills. The ship had made many voyages in the intervening eleven years, but this was different.

IMU - the Maritime Varsity in turmoil

Posted to IMU - the Maritime Varsity in turmoil (by Joseph Fonseca) on April 10, 2013

Four years into its existence, the Indian Maritime University set up under the Union government has turned out to be a big disappointment. Most stakeholders in maritime education and training feel let down on hearing the disturbing news about the new vice-chancellor…

Civil engineers update their report card on ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

In what is essentially an update of a 2012 report, The American Society of Civil Engineers has awarded a C grade to the nation’s seaports and their efforts to keep up with essential maintenance and improvement. Much of the report I covered in…