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Saturday, December 7, 2019

Yangtze shipping left high and dry

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on January 25, 2012

The Year of the Dragon begins now, represented in the Chinese zodiac by the Water Dragon. There is some irony in that, because the worst drought in 50 years has forced Chinese maritime authorities to close the Yangtze River above the port of Wuhan, more than 600 miles upriver from Shanghai.

Louisiana is Shipyard Leader in USA

Posted to Ship Building in the US Gulf Coast Region (by Tyler LeCompte) on January 19, 2012

Leevac’s shipyard in Louisiana and new vessel construction facilities include an 85,000-square-foot computerized steel fabrication shop (with a computer-aided plasma cutting machine), a computerized pipe machine (three-axis pipe cutting system)…

Cross-currents show up in the Harbor Maintenance Tax uproar

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 29, 2011

That proposal to apply the Harbor Maintenance Tax to imports taking the long way round through Canada and Mexico is stirring up considerable debate that exposes sharply different viewpoints. So much so that the Shipping Federation of Canada…

Administration soft peddling piracy attacks on Indian seafarers

Posted to Administration soft peddling piracy attacks on Indian seafarers (by Joseph Fonseca) on December 28, 2011

The seafaring community, seafarers’ union, ship owners and the trade appear to have reached the end of their tether as a result of the apathy of the Indian administration towards continuing piracy and mere lip service being paid to the plight of the unfortunate hijacked Indian seafarers.

Marad’s Crown Jewel: v2 – a work in progress…

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 14, 2011

You have to ask yourself – what’s the hurry? The urgency with which the U.S. Department of Transportation and its usually ineffective Maritime Administration seem to be intent on reinventing the wheel on the campus of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy is simply breathtaking.

Pensacola

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 9, 2011

Pensacola is the westernmost city in Florida, nearly extending into Alabama. It is the homeport for a number of fishing vessels and small passenger vessels. One of its claims to fame is that it is the site of the first European settlement in…

Some TWICs Won’t Work in Readers

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on December 6, 2011

Some 26,000 Transportation Worker Identification Credentials (TWICs) may be rejected by TWIC reader machines because of defective encoding. At some point recently, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) posted on the “Latest News”…

Henry Hudson

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2011

Little is known of Henry Hudson prior to 1607, when he was hired by the Muscovy Company of the Kingdom of England to find a northern route to the Far East. He and a crew of ten sailed on the 80-ton Hopewell. They reached the east coast of Greenland and traveled north to the ice pack.

Seven Seas Navigation to conduct training in India for Panama Registry

Posted to Seven Seas Navigation to conduct training in India for Panama Registry (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 21, 2011

Seven Seas Navigation India Pvt Ltd., Mumbai has been authorized by the Seafarers Training Center in Panama to conduct Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) courses authorized by the Maritime Authority of Panama. These…

Part 2 of: Establishing an On-Line Trainer Community for Your Maritime Organization

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on November 2, 2011

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.Part 2 of 3:  Establishing…

The Train Wreck at DOT

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on October 19, 2011

It has been an interesting autumn at the U.S. Maritime Administration and for its Department of Transportation parent, as well. Little in the way of good news is to be had for anyone; much less the U.S. domestic waterfront itself. The abrupt…

Pipavav Shipyard set to deliver their first vessel

Posted to Pipavav Shipyard set to deliver their first vessel (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 12, 2011

After some hiccups Pipavav Defence and Offshore Engineering Company Limited will finally be giving delivery of their first vessel later this month. India’s largest shipyard at the Gulf of Cambay in Gujarat on the West coast has been flush with…

Proposed USCG STCW Regulations Impact Maritime Security

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 29, 2011

Proposed US Coast Guard regulations to implement the STCW Convention will, if adopted, have both direct and indirect impacts on maritime transportation security programs. That said, implementation of the maritime-security-specific STCW amendments…

The ILWU and Panama pilots tie-up might not have the pulling power

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on September 23, 2011

The Panama Canal's Alberto Aleman Zubieta is doing the rounds of the maritime equivalent of the TV talk shows – annual conferences and conventions. Most recently he was at the South Carolina trade conference, where the audience pondered deeply…

Alfred Thayer Mahan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 16, 2011

Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914) was born at West Point, where his father was an instructor. After graduating with distinction from the US Naval Academy in 1859, he served blockade duty on a number of warships during the Civil War. Mahan was promoted at…

USS Princeton

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 30, 2011

The frigate USS Princeton, launched in 1843, was named after Princeton, New Jersey, site of an American victory during the Revolutionary War. The city was also the home of the prominent Stockton family, avid supporters of the project to build the vessel.

Seek Boat Crew Workers

Posted to Crew Workers Wanted (by Cindy Miller) on August 28, 2011

We want to use this medium to inform you that our Cruise company has offer employment opportunities for foreigner. We have jobs opening from restaurant, Office-work, to child care section in London, United Kingdom. Job Salary: This will Depend on your specialization…

Henry Morgan

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 19, 2011

Henry Morgan (1635-1688) was born in Wales and died in Jamaica. Between those two dates, he lived a notorious and audacious life. At age twenty, he sailed to Barbados where he served as an apprentice to a cutler. Three years later, he showed up in Jamaica as a soldier of fortune.

Georg Wilhelm Steller

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2011

Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709-1746) was a naturalist and zoologist, noted for being the first European to set foot in what is now Alaska and for describing and documenting some of the unique animal life of the region. He was born in Windsheim, Bavaria and studied at the University of Wittenberg.

USCG Waives Maritime Security Regulations for Some Facilities

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on July 26, 2011

The US Coast has just issued MTSA Policy Advisory Council Decision 02-11 (PAC 02-11), “Waiving Facilities that Transfer Certain Low Risk Commodities.”  Owners/operators of MTSA-regulated facilities that transfer or store bulk commodities that are listed in the Decision as being low risk can…