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Tuesday, December 1, 2020

TSA Announces TWIC Extension Option

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on June 18, 2012

On June 15, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) TWIC website announced a forthcoming option for many holders of the Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) to extend the expiration date of their TWICs pending implementation…

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…

DHS Issues Long-Awaited TWIC Reader Report

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on March 12, 2012

When designed, installed, and operated consistent with the characteristics and business needs of the facility or vessel operation, TWIC reader systems can make access decisions efficiently and effectively. Numerous options for validating…

Akash Dredging & Marine Services acquire cutter suction dredger

Posted to Akash Dredging & Marine Services acquire cutter suction dredger (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 15, 2012

With the inauguration of their first cutter suction dredger (CSD), AKASH-1 this morning at ABG SHIPYARD, Dahej, Akash Dredging & Marine Services (P) Ltd, Visakhapatnam (ADAMS) has become the new entrant into the dredging arena. The company,…

Andres de Urdaneta

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 7, 2012

Andres de Urdaneta (1498-1568) sailed in the Loaisa Expedition that departed Spain in 1525 to reach the Spice Islands via the Pacific Ocean, thus avoiding the Portuguese monopoly on the Indian Ocean route. The expedition, initially comprised of seven ships, was a disaster.

Georg Wilhelm Steller

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 5, 2011

Georg Wilhelm Steller (1709-1746) was a naturalist and zoologist, noted for being the first European to set foot in what is now Alaska and for describing and documenting some of the unique animal life of the region. He was born in Windsheim, Bavaria and studied at the University of Wittenberg.

Maritime Security Directive on Piracy: Update

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on January 12, 2011

The Notice of Availability for the US Coast Guard’s Maritime Security Directive 104-6 (Rev 5) is scheduled for publication in the Federal Register tomorrow (January 13). My earlier speculation that Revision 5 increased the area of the Indian…

Petrobras Expands CENPES Research Center

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on October 12, 2010

With the expansion the complex on Fundão Island will occupy more than 300 thousand m² making it one of the largest centers of applied research in the world. There will be various laboratories designed to meet the technological demands of Petrobras’ business areas…

Long Beach Blows a Raspberry at Local Politicians

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on July 15, 2010

The principle of "One hand washing the other" might apply to Washington bureaucrats and politicians, but Long Beach port authorities are having none of it. The angst over the LB city council demanding an extra dollop of cash from the port for the Tidelands fund continues…

Live oak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 25, 2010

Live oak is a term used to refer to oak trees that are evergreen (retain leaves year-round, thus “alive”). There are a number of evergreen oak species and many are found in the southeastern United States (North Carolina to Texas). A mature live oak tree is massive…

St. Lawrence Seaway

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 14, 2010

The St. Lawrence Seaway is a system of locks, canals, and channels providing a connection for ocean-going ships between the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Small vessels had historically traveled this route, although portage was often required around rapids…

Now GL also helps to raise the bar ashore

Posted to Now GL also helps to raise the bar ashore (by Joseph Fonseca) on April 26, 2010

Fervent pleas at various forums for help in inducting marine officers leaving the sea to start a new life ashore, has finally found a knight in shining armor. With an ever growing tide of marine officers coming ashore, Germanischer Lloyd (GL)…

USCG Districts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 6, 2010

The US Coast Guard adopted the concept of geographic districts when it absorbed the US Lighthouse Service in 1939. Previously, it had no formal segmentation of its chain of command based on geography. Rather, the chain of command was grouped around function.
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