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Friday, December 6, 2019

HMS Endeavour

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 2, 2014

The bark HMS Endeavour was built in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke. A type known locally as a Whitby Cat, it had a broad, flat bow, a square stern, a long box-like body with a deep hold, and a flat bottom. Originally ship-rigged, it was…

Sea otter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 31, 2014

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a member of the weasel family that ran away to sea. It is the smallest of the marine mammals and the only one that does not rely on fat (blubber) for warmth. Rather, it has the thickest coat of fur of any mammal – up to one million strands of hair per square inch.

Fluyt

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2013

The fluyt or fluitschip was one of the first ocean-going ships built exclusively for commerce. Previously, ships tended to be built to perform the dual role of fighting battles and carrying cargo. Thus, their construction was fairly robust and they carried cannons, ammunition, and combat personnel.

Regional Scale Nodes Project

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 9, 2013

The University of Washington is leading the Regional Scale Nodes Project for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Ocean Observatory Initiative. The cabled underwater research facility is being constructed off the Oregon and Washington coasts.

Hutch port boss weighs into docker strike

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on April 30, 2013

Hutchison Port Holdings is not accustomed to being in the public eye. As the world’s number one container port operator, HPH has been happy conducting its business quietly and under the media radar. In the past, attempts to elicit comment on…

USS Enterprise

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 14, 2012

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was deactivated at Naval Station Norfolk on 1 December 2012, after 50 years of ground-breaking service. The 1,123-foot long vessel was laid down in 1958 and entered service in 1962 as the world’s first nuclear powered surface warship.

Albatross

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2012

The albatross is the largest of all birds in terms of wingspan (up to 12 feet). It can be found soaring above all ocean waters of the Southern Hemisphere and above the North Pacific. It is largely absent from the North Atlantic, probably due to loss of habitat.

The Move to Blended Learning in Maritime Training

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on May 21, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.The Move to Blended…

Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched

Posted to Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched (by Joseph Fonseca) on April 30, 2012

In a major development for cargo movement between India and the African continent, the Indo-Africa freight corridor branded, TransAfrica service was launched in Mumbai last fortnight. Promoted jointly by Transocean Express Logistics Pvt Ltd.…

APU / Maritime Reporter WEBCAST Series Kicks off in February

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 22, 2010

Maritime stakeholders continue to face complex challenges. Maintaining a healthy bottom line in the face of a myriad of regulatory, environmental and operational risks, therefore, has become Job 1. Preventing the loss of vessel and crew from acts of piracy…

U.S. Coast Guard: Cherry-Picking is Not an Option

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 1, 2010

Responding directly to our August 10th article entitled, “STCW Compliance: will we or won’t we,” the U.S. Coast Guard’s Director of National and International Standards has affirmed the U.S. position on STCW compliance, especially as it relates…

Carriers in for a brutal year as capacity floods in

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 4, 2012

Alphaliner’s chart of the week focuses on the new tonnage that has been added by the top 20 container shipping lines in the past 12 months. As incredible as the capacity is – 844,000 TEUs for a fleet growth of 6.4 percent – the one carrier that stands out is CSAV.

Nikumaroro

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 21, 2010

Nikumaroro (previously known as Gardner Island) is a small coral atoll in the central Pacific Ocean situated just south of the Equator and just west of the 180th meridian. It lies in the Phoenix Island Chain and is part of the Republic of Kiribati.

One Small Step for the TWIC Program?

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 30, 2010

Last week the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) updated its list of TWIC Readers that have successfully completed the Initial Capability Evaluation (ICE) to include an additional hand-held reader. This brings the total of portable…

Move to give STCW a slant on learning

Posted to Move to give STCW a slant on learning (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 6, 2010

With near misses and accidents on the rise while at sea, the focus has with intensity come to rest on training and STCW conventions. A lot of soul searching and introspection is taking place with a section of trainers coming to the conclusion…

Irano Hind may weather US/EU ban

Posted to Irano Hind may weather US/EU ban (by Joseph Fonseca) on August 2, 2010

The sanctions imposed by the US and the European Union on Iran because of its nuclear ambitions are likely to see the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines and a number of entities with which it is associated becoming prime targets. For Irano…

SCI takes delivery of its first LR-I size Product Tanker

Posted to SCI takes delivery of its first LR-I size Product Tanker (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 26, 2010

State owned Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI) took delivery of a Long Range-I (LR-I) Product Tanker, M.T. Swarna Sindhu, on 23rd July, 2010 raising the number of tankers in its fleet to 41 and the company’s total fleet strength to 74 vessels. M.T.

Subsea Power Grid to Enable Large-Scale Subsea Processing

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on June 16, 2010

Large-scale seabed processing facilities will require a subsea power grid system that is able to operate for long step-outs with total reliability withstanding extreme pressure and temperatures. As technology leader on land-based power grids…

St. Lawrence Seaway

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 14, 2010

The St. Lawrence Seaway is a system of locks, canals, and channels providing a connection for ocean-going ships between the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Small vessels had historically traveled this route, although portage was often required around rapids…

Indian shipping tonnage at record level

Posted to Indian shipping tonnage at record level (by Joseph Fonseca) on May 5, 2010

After a two-year slump, the Indian shipping tonnage registered a robust growth to touch the all time high of 9.71 million GT as of 30 April 2010. This buoyancy is expected to continue and the tonnage could well cross the 10 million mark soon…
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