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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Battle of Actium

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 23, 2015

After the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., the Roman Republic was led by the Second Triumvirate, which consisted of Octavian (the adopted son of Julius Caesar), Mark Antony (the magister equitum of Caesar’s army), and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (a political ally of Julius Caesar).

Talking With the Experts About Maritime Safety Culture - What is it And How to Improve It?

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on September 2, 2013

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

Sea otter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 31, 2014

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a member of the weasel family that ran away to sea. It is the smallest of the marine mammals and the only one that does not rely on fat (blubber) for warmth. Rather, it has the thickest coat of fur of any mammal – up to one million strands of hair per square inch.

International Talk Like A Pirate Day

Posted to Capt Jills Journeys (by Jill Friedman) on September 19, 2014

Check my blog for todays post on International Talk Like A Pirate Day (with important links) and how you can get involved. http://captjillsjourneys.wordpress.com/2014/09/19/happy-international-talk-like-a-pirate-day/

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Saudi Arabia

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Saudi Arabia Inspection in   Saudi Arabia/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in   Saudi Arabia, Countries. Dr Capt.

Taiping Island

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 24, 2014

The Spratly Islands are a group of islets, cays, atolls, and coral reefs located in the southern portion of the South China Sea. Taiping Island (also called Itu Aba Island) is the largest of these islets and the only one with fresh water springs.

Teak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 20, 2014

Teak is the common name for the Tectona grandis, a member of the verbena family native to the hardwood forests of India, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia. It is a large deciduous tree, growing to a height of 130 feet, with gray and grayish brown branches.

Malacca

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2014

The Strait of Malacca is named after Malacca, now part of Malaysia. In about the year 1400, Parameswana, the last Raja of Singapura, was expelled from the area around present-day Singapore by local rivals. He relocated to the fishing village of Malacca…

Gulf States Shipbuilders Consortium Tackles Big Issues

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 3, 2014

I want to start out by thanking Audrey (Kennedy) for inviting me to speak to you this afternoon. It’s a privilege to do so, especially with an audience representing such an important part of the domestic waterfront, and at a time when much of…

Elephant seal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 1, 2014

Elephant seals are large seals represented by two species, the northern elephant seal and the southern elephant seal. Both were hunted to near extinction through the end of the nineteenth century. The smaller northern elephant seal is found in the eastern portion of the North Pacific Ocean…

Integrating India’s Transport Network

Posted to Integrating India’s Transport Network (by Joseph Fonseca) on March 24, 2014

The logistics sector in India has today become an area of priority. One prime reason for it stems from the fact that years of high growth in the Indian economy have resulted in a significant rise in the volume of freight traffic movement. This…

McMurdo Sound

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 14, 2014

McMurdo Sound (approximately 35 miles long and 30 miles wide) connects the Ross Sea to the north to the Ross Ice Shelf on the coast of Antarctica due south of New Zealand. This body of water, frequently ice-covered, was discovered by Captain…

"What is the point of testing in Maritime Training"? Very few people know the correct answer to this question. This is a problem.

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on February 24, 2014

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

European delegations’ visits - boost bilateral ties

Posted to European delegations’ visits - boost bilateral ties (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 27, 2013

India plays host to yet another major delegation after the just concluded visit of the eight-member Danish delegation led by Nick Haekkerup, Minister for Trade and Economic Affairs, Denmark having visited the Dadri facility of APM Terminals India Pvt. Ltd.

Austro-Hungarian North Pole Expedition

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2013

Well into the nineteenth century, many believed that the region of the North Pole was open water, surrounded by floating ice. If one could only locate an opening in the ice, it would be possible to sail from the temperate region to the North Pole and possibly out the other side.

Fluyt

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2013

The fluyt or fluitschip was one of the first ocean-going ships built exclusively for commerce. Previously, ships tended to be built to perform the dual role of fighting battles and carrying cargo. Thus, their construction was fairly robust and they carried cannons, ammunition, and combat personnel.

Rates hit lowest levels ever, GRIs reach for record highs – go figure

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 10, 2013

Here's the story so far ... European demand for containerized imports from China vanished as the continent melted down into a steaming pile of sovereign debt. Meanwhile, the ever-optimistic and market share protecting shipping lines continued to place orders for new ships.

Civil engineers update their report card on ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

In what is essentially an update of a 2012 report, The American Society of Civil Engineers has awarded a C grade to the nation’s seaports and their efforts to keep up with essential maintenance and improvement. Much of the report I covered in…

CG 36500

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 19, 2013

The US Coast Guard motor lifeboat 36500 is the only one of the many hundreds that were built between the 1930s and the 1950s to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. On 18 February 1952, during a severe winter storm off Cape Cod…

Ship emissions an afterthought at Hong Kong cruise terminal

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on March 6, 2013

When it comes to infrastructure projects in Hong Kong, environmental concerns are rarely allowed to stand in the way. The grossly wasteful and pointless Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge is a case in point, and we do not have the slightest doubt…