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Friday, July 19, 2019

Market expectations from DNV and GL merger

Posted to Market expectations from DNV and GL merger (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 23, 2013

The recent announcement of the merger of the two classification societies Germanischer Lloyd (GL) and Det Norske Veritas (DNV) seems to have caused an unsettling effect on shipping companies, classification societiesand others related organizations.

dynamic responses determine stability at sea

Posted to for those in motion on the ocean (by Peter Ebbutt) on December 19, 2012

Stabilicube…tracks changes in stability as waves sweep thru, winds gust, liquids transfer via open cross connects, tanks slosh, cargo shifts, water is still trapped on deck, towline angles and tensions change. Stabilicube takes the guess work out of operations at sea.

China looks inwards as export demand remains weak

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 25, 2012

China became known as the world’s factory by offering manufacturing costs that could not be matched by the developed nations. Its wages paid to uneducated rural migrant labour were a fraction of the mostly unionized pay required in the West, and land for factories was plentiful and cheap.

Salish Sea

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 4, 2011

The Salish Sea extends from the southern end of Puget Sound, near Olympia, Washington, north through Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia to Desolation Sound, and west to where the Strait of Juan de Fuca meets the Pacific Ocean. Its name derives…

Skuld takes the Indian offshore by storm

Posted to Skuld takes the Indian offshore by storm (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 23, 2011

Skuld has made a clean sweep of the Indian offshore opportunities by being the only player to provide innovative insurance and risk management solution. It is Skuld’s unique and exclusive offer covering contractual liabilities along with other…

China factories being pushed over the edge

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on November 8, 2011

We asked the question last week that retailers in the US and Europe must surely be ready to put in last minute orders to restock their inventories before the Christmas buying season starts in earnest. Yesterday we received the answer, from the US, at least.

Sikorsky HH-52 Seaguard Helicopter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 1, 2011

The first modern amphibious helicopter capable of regular rescue operations in the offshore marine environment was the Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard. This aircraft could cruise at 98 miles per hour, had a range of 474 miles, and could carry ten passengers in addition to a crew of two.

China factories slowly climbing the value chain

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 8, 2011

It may seem we harp on about China’s changing manufacturing industry, but that's because of its direct impact on export ocean cargo and the import of raw materials. All the stuff we consume has to be made somewhere, and the mainland has pretty much cornered the manufacturing market.

Biofouling

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2011

Biofouling is the accumulation of microorganisms, algae, plants, and/or animals on wetted surfaces, particularly the hulls of ships. This became a significant problem as European mariners started making extended sea voyages in the late fifteenth century.

DGPS

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 11, 2011

The Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) is an augmented version of the satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS) operated by the US Air Force. The GPS was originally designed to provide two levels of service: an open-signal L1…

A PR Opportunity Wasted

Posted to Observations (by Charmaine Berina) on January 14, 2011

Did you know that 2010 was designated by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in London as the “Year of the Seafarer?” No? Don’t feel lonely. No one else knew it either. The idea of focusing the attention of the maritime industry and…

Surprises are in Store over Shipping Act Maneuvering

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on November 30, 2010

US maritime politics is getting murkier, who would have thought of it? Just when the straitjacket of antitrust regulation   was about to be wrapped around the  TransPacific Stabilization Agreement, the politicians seemed to be getting ready…

Subsea Equipment & Services Demand Continues Growing in Brazil

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on November 2, 2010

The deepwater scene is in full swing in Brazil, with major projects being developed by various operators and national operator Petrobras. All these projects require a multitude of subsea equipment and subsea services, which accounted for a steady…

BIMCO and IBIA Launch Electronic Guide to Bunkering

Posted to Company News (by Jocelyn Redfern) on October 27, 2010

BIMCO Asia Liaison Officer Thomas Timlen, and IBIA Chief Executive Ian Adams released the BIMCO and IBIA Bunkering Guide on October 27 to delegates in Singapore attending the 16th Singapore International Bunkering Conference. A limited number…

Indian Ports (Consolidated) Act of 2010 in the offing

Posted to Indian Ports (Consolidated) Act of 2010 in the offing (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 18, 2010

The draft of the Indian Ports (Consolidated) Act 2010 is likely to come before the Lok Sabha of the Indian parliament during the coming Winter Session. The proposed Act is said to be in line with the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) of USA…

Ports Turn Into Cash Cows

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on July 29, 2010

It was probably inevitable, but Long Beach city council is setting the way and opening up new, unfriendly dimensions (for ports and shipping lines at least) with its treatment of the city's port. Though a final vote has still to be taken, the city wants to take 5 percent of GROSS REVENUE…

On Environmental Offices

Posted to We Love Your Ship (by Joseph Wrinn) on June 15, 2010

We create efficient designs, why don’t we work in environmentally friendly offices? As engineers, we always look for ways to improve on our designs. The first improvement in design usually occurs when we can design a more efficient solution to the given problem.

Experiments to curtail CO2 emissions

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on June 6, 2010

Three parallel projects are currently running with NYK Line ships under the Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism initiative to investigate technological developments to curtail CO2 emissions from marine vessels. Project 1 concerns hull friction reduction…

Did the Chilean Quake Shorten Earth Days?

Posted to MarineNews Notes (by Raina Clark) on March 3, 2010

According to a report from NASA, the Feb. JPL research scientist Richard Gross computed how Earth's rotation should have changed as a result of the Feb. 27 quake. Using a complex model, he and fellow scientists came up with a preliminary calculation…