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Friday, July 19, 2019

Falling Short:

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on May 25, 2011

Shoehorned into a narrow one-hour slot immediately preceding the Israeli Prime Minister’s speech to Congress, the (feigned) importance of U.S. maritime regulatory policies became all-too-obvious during a subcommittee hearing largely comprised of grandstanding by various house members.

NMSAC Makes Recommendations on Seafarer Shore Access

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on May 20, 2011

The National Maritime Security Advisory Committee (NMSAC) met by teleconference this morning (May 20th) to finalize a Resolution on Seafarer Shore Access. The Resolution was adopted unanimously, after two amendments. One of the maritime transportation…

Evergreen shrugs off conservative cloak

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on April 26, 2012

Working out supply and demand is a tricky business at the best of times, so trying to predict the container shipping market a year or two in advance is as good as sucking a thumb and writing down the first thing that comes to mind. Looking at an Alphaliner chart of current vs ordered ships…

SS Ideal X

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 27, 2012

The ship that became famous as the Ideal X began life as a mass-produced T-2 tanker called the Potrero Hills, launched on December 30, 1944 by the Marinship Corporation of Sausalito, California. It changed ownership and names several times after the conclusion of World War II…

SMP conference takes the gateway to growth

Posted to SMP conference takes the gateway to growth (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 20, 2012

The last few months have seen a number of conferences and exhibitions taking place in different metros of India most of them going unnoticed. However, the SMP World Conference 2012 which is always conducted on a dual theme was different. For…

Right whales

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 17, 2012

There are three species of right whales (four if you include the bowhead whale). These are the North Atlantic right whale, the North Pacific right whale, and the Southern right whale. They acquired the name “right” from whalers, because these whales are commonly found near land and because…

Kort nozzle

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 14, 2012

A Kort nozzle is a hydrodynamically-designed shroud that encircles a ship’s propeller just outside the blade tips. The entire assembly of the propeller and the nozzle is referred to as a ducted propeller. The concept of the ducted propeller…

Salish Sea

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 4, 2011

The Salish Sea extends from the southern end of Puget Sound, near Olympia, Washington, north through Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia to Desolation Sound, and west to where the Strait of Juan de Fuca meets the Pacific Ocean. Its name derives…

Ports and carriers make huge strides in cutting pollution

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 30, 2012

The anti-pollution brigade continues to rule the waves in port planning in California, imposing ever more strict standards every year. A conference/workshop in Long Beach earlier this month shows just how well the industry has done in keeping up with these demands. Long Beach is a prime example.

Delving into Beat The Canal leaders

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on January 19, 2012

Strange bedfellows are making strange machinations in the united front (Beat The Canal) to stop the Panama Canal taking West Coast port traffic. Those dependable stalwarts, the ILWU local union shops, are rejuvenating their efforts to stop vessels calling at Longview's grain terminal…

Skuld takes the Indian offshore by storm

Posted to Skuld takes the Indian offshore by storm (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 23, 2011

Skuld has made a clean sweep of the Indian offshore opportunities by being the only player to provide innovative insurance and risk management solution. It is Skuld’s unique and exclusive offer covering contractual liabilities along with other…

China factories being pushed over the edge

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on November 8, 2011

We asked the question last week that retailers in the US and Europe must surely be ready to put in last minute orders to restock their inventories before the Christmas buying season starts in earnest. Yesterday we received the answer, from the US, at least.

Top three driving Asia-Europe rates into the sea bed

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 26, 2011

Looking at the container shipping rates, it seems that for a carrier to even achieve zero rate would be an improvement. The bunker adjustment factors being charged are more than the rate per TEU, which means the lines are paying shippers to transport their cargo.

HMS Rattler

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 2, 2011

A steam-powered side-wheeler with the tentative name HMS Ardent was under construction in Sheerness when the Royal Navy decided to begin its own experiments with screw propulsion. When commissioned in 1844, the newly-named HMS Rattler became…

War of Jenkins’ Ear

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 15, 2011

Relations between Spain and Great Britain during the 1730’s were strained to say the least. Spain had granted to British ships extensive trading rights in Spanish colonies in the Americas and now rued the decision. There were numerous confrontations…

Sikorsky HH-52 Seaguard Helicopter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 1, 2011

The first modern amphibious helicopter capable of regular rescue operations in the offshore marine environment was the Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard. This aircraft could cruise at 98 miles per hour, had a range of 474 miles, and could carry ten passengers in addition to a crew of two.

China factories slowly climbing the value chain

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on June 8, 2011

It may seem we harp on about China’s changing manufacturing industry, but that's because of its direct impact on export ocean cargo and the import of raw materials. All the stuff we consume has to be made somewhere, and the mainland has pretty much cornered the manufacturing market.

Offshore gas & oil ship repairs industry set for a makeover for achieving rapid growth

Posted to Offshore gas & oil ship repairs industry set for a makeover for achieving rapid growth (by Joseph Fonseca) on May 30, 2011

The ship repair opportunities in Indian offshore oil and gas sector remained stagnant for two decades as the industry had been mainly dependent on the public sector infrastructure. With few dedicated large players in the field, the several smaller…

Small Washington Ferry Struggles

Posted to MarineNews Notes (by Raina Clark) on May 8, 2011

Whatcom County Public Works Ferry Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Whatcom Chief, a ferry connecting Lummi Island to mainland Washington via a short run across a narrow waterway between Bellingham Bay and Lummi Bay.

A Glimmer of Hope

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on April 27, 2011

It wasn’t too long ago that – for seemingly the umpteenth time – I lambasted the U.S. Maritime Administration and its DOT parent for its continued, abject neglect of the domestic maritime industry. I won’t apologize for any of it and I stand behind every word of every article.