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Thursday, October 18, 2018

Sea lily

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 13, 2015

The sea lily (Bourgueticrinida) is an order of marine animals referred to as crinoids. They are typically found in deep ocean waters (to a depth of about 18,000 feet). In their adult form, they are attached to the sea floor by means of a stalk.

Near Misses: Saving Ourselves One Miss at a Time......

Posted to Madden Maritime (by Richard Madden) on October 18, 2014

"Near-miss : A sequence of events and/or conditions that could have resulted in loss. This loss was prevented only by a fortuitous break in the chain of events and/or conditions. Near-miss reporting and investigating is something that mariners have been doing for many years now.

Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy in Chile

Posted to Global Marine Cargo Vessel Inspection Surveyors and Consultancy (by Vietnam Inspection Company) on July 30, 2014

Chile Inspection in Chile/ Expediting/ Surveillance/ Inspector/Expediter/  Quality control/ Testing/ Certificate/ Marine Surveyors/Superintendent P&I Correspondents Insured cargo, marine investigation & adjusting in Chile, Countries. Dr Capt.

Cape Cod Canal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 15, 2014

The Cape Cod Canal is a seven-mile long sea level canal connecting Cape Cod Bay to the north with Buzzards Bay to the south. Maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), it has a minimum channel width of 480 feet and an authorized depth of 32 feet at mean low water.

Talking With the Experts About Maritime Safety Culture - What is it And How to Improve It?

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on September 2, 2013

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

Malacca

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 8, 2014

The Strait of Malacca is named after Malacca, now part of Malaysia. In about the year 1400, Parameswana, the last Raja of Singapura, was expelled from the area around present-day Singapore by local rivals. He relocated to the fishing village of Malacca…

Chowgule’s ship-lift fast becoming a reality

Posted to Chowgule’s ship-lift fast becoming a reality (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 8, 2014

Mid-way between Mumbai and Goa on the West coast of India, a new ship-lift facility being constructed by the Chowgule group, is fast becoming a reality. Situated adjacent to the group’s Angre Port, the repair yard will have the capacity to handle six ships simultaneously of up to 10…

LA and Long Beach have little cheer this Christmas

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 22, 2013

Just as has been feared, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are now governed by political appointees, city council favorites and no one who has a technical maritime background. Dynamic is hardly the word to describe the commissioners. The…

Tamu Massif

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 4, 2013

In the northwestern Pacific Ocean about 1,000 miles east of Japan lies the Shatsky Rise, an elevated portion of the seabed that covers an area the size of California. It was from the aircraft carrier USS Hornet that Doolittle’s Raiders were launched on 18 April 1942 in waters above the Rise.

Upward Falling Payloads

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 24, 2013

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the people who brought you the Internet, is seeking a different method of addressing the worldwide demands of maritime domain awareness in times of crises. While the US Navy is large, its…

T-3

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 15, 2013

T-3, also known as Fletcher’s Ice Island, was a large iceberg in the Arctic Ocean used for many years as a scientific research facility by the United States Government. It was identified in 1947 by USAF Colonel Joseph O. Fletcher. Following the end of World War II…

S.A. Agulhas II

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on January 18, 2013

The Agulhas II replaces the older and smaller Agulhas as South Africa’s supply vessel for its scientific and weather stations in Antarctica (SANAE IV located on a rocky outcrop several miles inland in the Queen Maud region); on Marion Island…

TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role

Posted to TAMP to lose its tariff fixing role (by Joseph Fonseca) on January 9, 2013

Facing all round flak the government has finally decided curtailing the tariff fixing function of the Tariff Authority for Major Ports (TAMP). This was one of the major decisions taken at the 14 Maritime States Development Council (MSDC) meeting of 8 January 2013. The Union Shipping Minister G.

Happy Holidays (?) from the West Coast

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on December 5, 2012

It’s that time of year again. Chestnuts roasting on an open fire, mistletoe over the front door and great expectations or the holiday season to come. What’s not to like? On the other hand, and with the strike by clerical workers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach…

India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit

Posted to India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 26, 2012

Lnoppen, better known as the “corridor of insight” organized their 3 India Port Expansion & Capacity Upgrading Summit last week on 22 and 23 November, 2012 in Mumbai. The Chairman of the conference Anand V. Sharma, Managing Director of Mantrana…

India Shipping Summit focuses on positive perspectives and opportunities

Posted to India Shipping Summit focuses on positive perspectives and opportunities (by Joseph Fonseca) on October 15, 2012

Acknowledging the economic downturn that has spread gloom in most spheres of activities, factoring in low key performances and struggles of stakeholders to remain afloat, the recently concluded India Shipping Summit 2012, held last week in Mumbai…

Not all Western Seaboard ports are depressed about the future

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on July 30, 2012

Northern California’s commercial maritime operations continue to send mixed signals about the state of business. While Oakland is taking a downbeat perspective, nearby Redwood City is doing better and the Washington port of Longview is living up to its name with a new strategic plan.

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…

Shipping Corporation of India orders 6 AHTS vessels

Posted to Shipping Corporation of India orders 6 AHTS vessels (by Joseph Fonseca) on February 8, 2012

Continuing with its acquisition program, state-owned, Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI) placed orders for six Anchor Handling, Towing and Supply (AHTS) vessels with ABG Shipyard Ltd, India’s largest private sector shipbuilder. This is…

Andres de Urdaneta

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 7, 2012

Andres de Urdaneta (1498-1568) sailed in the Loaisa Expedition that departed Spain in 1525 to reach the Spice Islands via the Pacific Ocean, thus avoiding the Portuguese monopoly on the Indian Ocean route. The expedition, initially comprised of seven ships, was a disaster.