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Saturday, August 18, 2018

HMS Endeavour

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 2, 2014

The bark HMS Endeavour was built in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke. A type known locally as a Whitby Cat, it had a broad, flat bow, a square stern, a long box-like body with a deep hold, and a flat bottom. Originally ship-rigged, it was…

Sea otter

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 31, 2014

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a member of the weasel family that ran away to sea. It is the smallest of the marine mammals and the only one that does not rely on fat (blubber) for warmth. Rather, it has the thickest coat of fur of any mammal – up to one million strands of hair per square inch.

Fluyt

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2013

The fluyt or fluitschip was one of the first ocean-going ships built exclusively for commerce. Previously, ships tended to be built to perform the dual role of fighting battles and carrying cargo. Thus, their construction was fairly robust and they carried cannons, ammunition, and combat personnel.

Fort Zeelandia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 1, 2013

Once the Dutch decided to compete with the Portuguese and the Spanish for maritime commerce with East Asia, they jumped in with both feet. After establishing a base in Batavia (modern-day Jakarta), they focused on trade with China and Japan.

Royal Arctic Line

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on October 29, 2013

The Royal Arctic Line A/S was spun off in 1993 from the Greenland conglomerate KNI. It is wholly owned and heavily subsidized by the Greenland Home Rule Government to provide maritime cargo transport to and from Greenland and to keep the many isolated settlements along the Greenland coast supplied.

Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 3, 2013

During the American Revolutionary War, British forces captured thousands of “rebels”. Those in uniform were accorded treatment somewhat akin to prisoner of war status. Those not in uniform, particularly the maritime privateers, were subjected to harsher conditions.

NMSAC September 2012 Meeting, Part I

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 24, 2012

After introductory remarks by NMSAC’s new Executive Director, USCG Captain Andrew Tucci (the spelling of all names in this post represents my best guesses), the September 11th session dealt with Cybersecurity, Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA)and Information Sharing…

TSA Announces TWIC Extension Option

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on June 18, 2012

On June 15, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) TWIC website announced a forthcoming option for many holders of the Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) to extend the expiration date of their TWICs pending implementation…

Regional Scale Nodes Project

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 9, 2013

The University of Washington is leading the Regional Scale Nodes Project for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Ocean Observatory Initiative. The cabled underwater research facility is being constructed off the Oregon and Washington coasts.

When Bill of Lading become the problem

Posted to When Bill of Lading become the problem (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 1, 2013

The mounting problems caused in relations to the Bills of Lading (B/L), an important document in the EXIM Trade, have been a matter of concern. Many importers, exporters, freight forwarders, shipping agents, carriers, other transporters etc.…

Hutch port boss weighs into docker strike

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on April 30, 2013

Hutchison Port Holdings is not accustomed to being in the public eye. As the world’s number one container port operator, HPH has been happy conducting its business quietly and under the media radar. In the past, attempts to elicit comment on…

The Move to Blended Learning in Maritime Training

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on May 21, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.The Move to Blended…

Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched

Posted to Transafrica, a dedicated Indo-Africa freight corridor service launched (by Joseph Fonseca) on April 30, 2012

In a major development for cargo movement between India and the African continent, the Indo-Africa freight corridor branded, TransAfrica service was launched in Mumbai last fortnight. Promoted jointly by Transocean Express Logistics Pvt Ltd.…

USS Enterprise

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 14, 2012

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was deactivated at Naval Station Norfolk on 1 December 2012, after 50 years of ground-breaking service. The 1,123-foot long vessel was laid down in 1958 and entered service in 1962 as the world’s first nuclear powered surface warship.

Tallying/ Supervision/ Weighing/ Sapmling/ Testing

Posted to Tallying/ Supervision/ Weighing/ Sapmling/ Testing (by AIM Surveyors) on October 2, 2012

AIM Commodity/ Cargo Tally Companies in Vietnam & Global We are a leader in providing Tally, Tallying, tally of quantity, tally of bags, sounding & measrement of volume, witness and calculation of weighing for cargo in bulk during loading and discharging into containers…

Surveyors, Marine Cargo

Posted to Marine Surveys n Cargo Inspections (by 1. MARINE SURVEY AND CARGO INSPECTION COMPANY IN VIETNAM) on October 2, 2012

What our marine & cargo surveys are?: Our Vietnam marine & cargo surveys are providing services of hull, marine cargo surveys & port loading and unloading supervision and consultant, cargo claims, inspections & loss control carried out by our Vietnamese independent marine surveyors…

Albatross

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2012

The albatross is the largest of all birds in terms of wingspan (up to 12 feet). It can be found soaring above all ocean waters of the Southern Hemisphere and above the North Pacific. It is largely absent from the North Atlantic, probably due to loss of habitat.

Revenue from sale of NOL building a relief to battered balance sheet

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 11, 2012

When it comes to investment strategies, property is generally deemed to be a highly attractive long-term prospect. That’s why people in the financial advising business advise people to buy rather than rent. No point in paying off your landlord’s home.

Carriers in for a brutal year as capacity floods in

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 4, 2012

Alphaliner’s chart of the week focuses on the new tonnage that has been added by the top 20 container shipping lines in the past 12 months. As incredible as the capacity is – 844,000 TEUs for a fleet growth of 6.4 percent – the one carrier that stands out is CSAV.

Henry Hudson

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2011

Little is known of Henry Hudson prior to 1607, when he was hired by the Muscovy Company of the Kingdom of England to find a northern route to the Far East. He and a crew of ten sailed on the 80-ton Hopewell. They reached the east coast of Greenland and traveled north to the ice pack.