28943 members and growing – the largest networking group in the maritime industry!

LoginJoin

Friday, January 21, 2022

McMurdo Sound

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 14, 2014

McMurdo Sound (approximately 35 miles long and 30 miles wide) connects the Ross Sea to the north to the Ross Ice Shelf on the coast of Antarctica due south of New Zealand. This body of water, frequently ice-covered, was discovered by Captain…

"What is the point of testing in Maritime Training"? Very few people know the correct answer to this question. This is a problem.

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on February 24, 2014

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

Excursion vessels in polar waters

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 11, 2014

The world was recently witness to a multi-national effort to rescue the Russian excursion vessel Akademik Shokalskiy after it was beset in wind-driven ice off the coast of Antarctica. The French supply vessel L’Astrolabe turned back from its relief effort.

UNCTAD (PART II) World consolidation continues

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on December 12, 2013

The UNCTAD review shows just how much the industry and the maritime world have changed over the last five years. The industry trend of consolidation and trimming excess fat shows up in unexpected corners. The average number of shipping companies…

Vessel collision accidents in China

Posted to Eversafe Marine (by song Tom) on December 9, 2013

December 6, 2013 morning, the two vessels "MV XIUMEI TIANJIN"  and "JIA LI HAI" collided in sea area of Zhejiang Zhoushan. The DWT 100,000 cargo ship “JIA LI HAI” owned by China COSCO was driving to Laotangshan port when got collision with 168 m long container ship "MV XIUMEI TIANJIN".

Fluyt

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2013

The fluyt or fluitschip was one of the first ocean-going ships built exclusively for commerce. Previously, ships tended to be built to perform the dual role of fighting battles and carrying cargo. Thus, their construction was fairly robust and they carried cannons, ammunition, and combat personnel.

Elisha Kane

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 3, 2013

Elisha Kent Kane (1820-1857) was born in Philadelphia and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School in 1842. Joining the United States Navy as a medical officer, he served in the China Commercial Treaty mission of 1844, in the Africa Squadron…

European delegations’ visits - boost bilateral ties

Posted to European delegations’ visits - boost bilateral ties (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 27, 2013

India plays host to yet another major delegation after the just concluded visit of the eight-member Danish delegation led by Nick Haekkerup, Minister for Trade and Economic Affairs, Denmark having visited the Dadri facility of APM Terminals India Pvt. Ltd.

Austro-Hungarian North Pole Expedition

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 22, 2013

Well into the nineteenth century, many believed that the region of the North Pole was open water, surrounded by floating ice. If one could only locate an opening in the ice, it would be possible to sail from the temperate region to the North Pole and possibly out the other side.

Cocos (Keeling) Islands

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 15, 2013

The island group, consisting of two atolls and about 27 coral islands, was stumbled upon by Captain William Keeling (1578-1620) of the East Indiaman Susanna. In 1609, he was returning to England from the East India Company’s trading post on Java.

Blues continue for troubled China Cosco

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on November 13, 2013

Don’t leave town, police told an executive director at China Cosco Holdings last week. Okay, they probably never said that, but it doesn’t change the fact that Xu Minjie is under investigation in what is widely believed to be part of Beijing’s crackdown on widespread corruption.

Fort Zeelandia

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 1, 2013

Once the Dutch decided to compete with the Portuguese and the Spanish for maritime commerce with East Asia, they jumped in with both feet. After establishing a base in Batavia (modern-day Jakarta), they focused on trade with China and Japan.

Rates hit lowest levels ever, GRIs reach for record highs – go figure

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on October 10, 2013

Here's the story so far ... European demand for containerized imports from China vanished as the continent melted down into a steaming pile of sovereign debt. Meanwhile, the ever-optimistic and market share protecting shipping lines continued to place orders for new ships.

Talking With the Experts About Maritime Safety Culture - What is it And How to Improve It?

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on September 2, 2013

Maritime Training: The full library of maritime training articles can be found here.Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog…

BIO Hesperides

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 16, 2013

The BIO Hesperides (A-33) is an ice-strengthened oceanographic vessel of the Spanish Navy. It is named for the nymphs in Greek mythology believed to tend a blissful garden in a far western corner of the world on the shore of the Oceanus. The ship, built in Cartagena, Spain, was commissioned in 1991.

Powerful Version of PrimeShip-HULL Design Software from ClassNK

Posted to Powerful Version of PrimeShip-HULL Design Software from ClassNK (by Joseph Fonseca) on June 5, 2013

The new version of its PrimeShip-HULL (HCSR) ship design support software is the latest creation by ClassNK that could bring about a sea-change in ship building. Amongst other features this version incorporates the new second draft of the IACS Harmonized Common Structural Rules…

TWIC: Alive and Kicking

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on May 22, 2013

The way forward for homeland security officials seems to be pretty clear when it comes to the much anticipated and often criticized Transportation Worker Identification Card (TWIC). Or maybe not. The U.S. Government Accounting Office (GAO) report…

Fracking could be the new future for some ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on April 28, 2013

Northwest and as the door on a coal terminal closes, another opens for hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Gray’s Harbor, normally associated with autos and breakbulk, is eyeing a huge bonanza in the form of crude-by-rail. The stuff will probably come from the fields…

Civil engineers update their report card on ports

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on March 31, 2013

In what is essentially an update of a 2012 report, The American Society of Civil Engineers has awarded a C grade to the nation’s seaports and their efforts to keep up with essential maintenance and improvement. Much of the report I covered in…

MV Queen of the North

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 22, 2013

The ro-ro ferry remembered as Queen of the North was built in Germany in 1969 and originally named MV Stena Danica. It operated between Gothenburg, Sweden and Frederikshavn, Denmark until 1974, when it was purchased by BC Ferries. Renamed MV Queen of Surrey…