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Friday, January 21, 2022

Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration?

Posted to Indian Navy and Coast Guard to the rescue of the Indian Administration? (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 16, 2012

The Government of India is mulling over the idea of handing over the statutory functions of the Indian Administration (Directorate General of Shipping) to the Indian Navy and the Coast Guard. As a beginning, the two agencies are likely to begin…

Cabotage Law relaxed for Vallarpadam in South India

Posted to Cabotage Law relaxed for Vallarpadam in South India (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 10, 2012

The Indian government has finally relaxed the Cabotage law for the Dubai Port World (DP World) operated International Container Transshipment Terminal (ICTT) at Vallarpadam, Kochi in South India despite the spirited opposition by the Indian ship owners lobby.

CG 36500

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 19, 2013

The US Coast Guard motor lifeboat 36500 is the only one of the many hundreds that were built between the 1930s and the 1950s to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. On 18 February 1952, during a severe winter storm off Cape Cod…

Ship emissions an afterthought at Hong Kong cruise terminal

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on March 6, 2013

When it comes to infrastructure projects in Hong Kong, environmental concerns are rarely allowed to stand in the way. The grossly wasteful and pointless Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge is a case in point, and we do not have the slightest doubt…

More than bananas and rum

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on February 28, 2013

And there you go. Those critics who claim the World Bank steers clear of maritime investment should note that the bank is looking at Kingston, Jamaica. Details are vague so far, but the government wants to expand the port into the major Caribbean…

Seahorse

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 12, 2013

The seahorse (genus Hippocampus) is a true, albeit strange-looking, fish. It shares the family Syngnathidae with the pipefish. Like other fish, it breathes through gills. But it lacks scales. Its skin is stretched over a series of interlocking bony plates…

USS Enterprise

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 14, 2012

The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN-65) was deactivated at Naval Station Norfolk on 1 December 2012, after 50 years of ground-breaking service. The 1,123-foot long vessel was laid down in 1958 and entered service in 1962 as the world’s first nuclear powered surface warship.

India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit

Posted to India’s port expansion and capacity upgrading summit (by Joseph Fonseca) on November 26, 2012

Lnoppen, better known as the “corridor of insight” organized their 3 India Port Expansion & Capacity Upgrading Summit last week on 22 and 23 November, 2012 in Mumbai. The Chairman of the conference Anand V. Sharma, Managing Director of Mantrana…

SCI acquires Kamsarmax Bulk carrier & PSV

Posted to SCI acquires Kamsarmax Bulk carrier & PSV (by Joseph Fonseca) on December 19, 2012

The Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI) accepted delivery of a Kamsarmax Bulk carrier, m.v. “Vishva Jyoti” yesterday. The vessel is the first of a series of four Kamsarmax bulk carriers ordered by SCI with Jiangsu Eastern Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., China.

Drive to cut costs may push shipping into the clouds

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on September 21, 2012

Maersk Line recently signed a US$150 million cloud computing deal with HP. In the five-year agreement, the Danish carrier will use HP’s cloud-enabled data centers and HP Workplace Services in what is known as an “instant-on enterprise”. Yes, that made no sense to me, either.

Albatross

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 14, 2012

The albatross is the largest of all birds in terms of wingspan (up to 12 feet). It can be found soaring above all ocean waters of the Southern Hemisphere and above the North Pacific. It is largely absent from the North Atlantic, probably due to loss of habitat.

SINKEX

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on July 31, 2012

The United States Navy disposes of many of its old, obsolete, and decommissioned warships by sinking them in deep ocean waters. This practice, called a sinking exercise or SINKEX, involves removing toxic and hazardous substances to the maximum practicable extent…

Carriers in for a brutal year as capacity floods in

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on July 4, 2012

Alphaliner’s chart of the week focuses on the new tonnage that has been added by the top 20 container shipping lines in the past 12 months. As incredible as the capacity is – 844,000 TEUs for a fleet growth of 6.4 percent – the one carrier that stands out is CSAV.

Long Beach stands toe-to-toe with its bigger neighbor

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on June 28, 2012

A dramatic shift in financial bulk is taking place at the two main Southern Californian ports over the next 18 months. For the first time, Long Beach will be looking its neighbor, Los Angeles, in the eye. The two ports are standing virtually…

Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 8, 2012

The man known to history as Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo (or Joao Rodrigues Cabrilho) was born in 1499 or 1500 in either Spain or Portugal. He appears to have formally acquired the surname Cabrillo (or Cabrilho) late in life. He arrived in Cuba as…

Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union

Posted to Great Offshore becomes India’s first full member of International Salvage Union (by Joseph Fonseca) on June 6, 2012

India has finally got their own internationally recognized and fully established salvage company which can now operate beyond the country’s borders and bid for major contracts all over the world that are open only to members of International Salvage Union.

Chinese research icebreaker Xue Long

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 25, 2012

The Xue Long (Snow Dragon) is the premier polar vessel of the People’s Republic of China. It was built in the Ukraine in 1993 and modified upon its acquisition by China in 1994. Its major function is to serve as a resupply vessel and scientific research platform in the Antarctic and the Arctic.

The Move to Blended Learning in Maritime Training

Posted to Maritime Training Issues with Murray Goldberg (by Murray Goldberg) on May 21, 2012

Blog Notifications: For the latest maritime training articles, visit our company blog here. You can receive notifications of new articles on our company blog by following the blog.Share this blog post.Follow me on Twitter.The Move to Blended…

Abel Tasman

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2012

Abel Tasman (1603-1659) was a Dutch merchant and explorer. He is credited with the European discovery of Australia and New Zealand. He joined the Dutch United East India Company (Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie - VOC) in 1633 and was promptly…

What have we learned from the Titanic casualty?

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 13, 2012

Late on the night of April 14, 1912, the “unsinkable” passenger ship RMS Titanic, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York struck an iceberg. It sank about three hours later, at about 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912. Of the 2,224 persons on board, 1,514 lost their lives.