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Friday, January 21, 2022

Back from the (almost) dead

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 5, 2010

The requirement for scanning of 100% of maritime shipping containers in overseas ports prior to loading on a ship bound for the United States was enacted into federal law (with various caveats) by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007.

One Small Step for the TWIC Program?

Posted to Maritime Transportation Security News and Views (by John C.W. Bennett) on September 30, 2010

Last week the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) updated its list of TWIC Readers that have successfully completed the Initial Capability Evaluation (ICE) to include an additional hand-held reader. This brings the total of portable…

Plug-in Shore Power

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on September 18, 2010

A major factor slowing down the more widespread use of plug-in shore power to permit cold ironing is the lack of a safe, troublesome and easy to use standard for the shore to ship connector. Further complicating the problem is the abundance…

Grog

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on September 17, 2010

As European ships began undertaking extended voyages in the fifteenth century, the provision of drinking water for the crew became increasingly difficult. Water in casks became rancid or polluted over time. It was soon discovered that diluting…

Drill Ship Construction Boom in Brazil

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on September 14, 2010

Petrobras alone is responsible for ordering a total of 28 drill ships of which 9 have already gone through the tendering process and will soon start being built. Transocean is building 9 drill ships at international shipyards, including the Petrobras 10…

Shipbuilding & Repair: Fragmented?

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 8, 2010

Rocketing quickly towards the end of the third quarter – and where did the time go, I ask you? – much is happening in the domestic shipbuilding arena. More correctly, there is plenty of news for American shipbuilders. That’s not to say that the industry resembles a beehive of activity. Far from it.

Move to give STCW a slant on learning

Posted to Move to give STCW a slant on learning (by Joseph Fonseca) on September 6, 2010

With near misses and accidents on the rise while at sea, the focus has with intensity come to rest on training and STCW conventions. A lot of soul searching and introspection is taking place with a section of trainers coming to the conclusion…

U.S. Coast Guard: Cherry-Picking is Not an Option

Posted to Global Maritime Analysis with Joseph Keefe (by Joseph Keefe) on September 1, 2010

Responding directly to our August 10th article entitled, “STCW Compliance: will we or won’t we,” the U.S. Coast Guard’s Director of National and International Standards has affirmed the U.S. position on STCW compliance, especially as it relates…

Coast Guard executes convicted murderer

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on August 17, 2010

James Horace Alderman had been convicted in federal court in Miami of the murder of two Coast Guardsmen and one Secret Service agent. Alderman was a notorious smuggler of alcoholic beverages – a rum runner – during the heyday of the Prohibition Era.

Why do people make mistakes?

Posted to Marine Propulsion Report (by Keith Henderson) on August 4, 2010

Mistakes cause accidents. That is the inevitable sequence of events and we humans are the people making the mistakes, but why? What are the reasons that people make mistakes? Following on from my earlier blog on accidents and NK’s guidelines how to prevent them…

Irano Hind may weather US/EU ban

Posted to Irano Hind may weather US/EU ban (by Joseph Fonseca) on August 2, 2010

The sanctions imposed by the US and the European Union on Iran because of its nuclear ambitions are likely to see the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines and a number of entities with which it is associated becoming prime targets. For Irano…

SCI takes delivery of its first LR-I size Product Tanker

Posted to SCI takes delivery of its first LR-I size Product Tanker (by Joseph Fonseca) on July 26, 2010

State owned Shipping Corporation of India Ltd. (SCI) took delivery of a Long Range-I (LR-I) Product Tanker, M.T. Swarna Sindhu, on 23rd July, 2010 raising the number of tankers in its fleet to 41 and the company’s total fleet strength to 74 vessels. M.T.

Change of Course in US Commercial Thinking

Posted to Martin Rushmere (by Martin Rushmere) on July 1, 2010

The industry in the US is always keen to accept, if not develop, technological advances, but is slow to adapt its thinking and management style. Recent events, not least the recent Great Recession, have forced a change of outlook and brought about fresh ideas.

Live oak

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 25, 2010

Live oak is a term used to refer to oak trees that are evergreen (retain leaves year-round, thus “alive”). There are a number of evergreen oak species and many are found in the southeastern United States (North Carolina to Texas). A mature live oak tree is massive…

Subsea Power Grid to Enable Large-Scale Subsea Processing

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on June 16, 2010

Large-scale seabed processing facilities will require a subsea power grid system that is able to operate for long step-outs with total reliability withstanding extreme pressure and temperatures. As technology leader on land-based power grids…

Sidney Smith (1764-1840)

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 15, 2010

Admiral Sir William Sidney Smith, Royal Navy, was a contemporary and fierce rival of Admiral Horatio Nelson. He first distinguished himself in the American Revolutionary War, as consequence of which he was appointed lieutenant of a 74-gun ship…

Thames Barrier

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on June 8, 2010

The Thames Barrier is a 1,710-foot wide movable flood control barrier across the River Thames just downstream from central London. After a ten-year construction period, it was officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on May 8, 1984.

New Discovery in Caratinga Field and Confirmation of Barracuda Field Potential

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on May 27, 2010

Petrobras has announced the discovery of two new light oil accumulations (29o API) in reservoirs in the Campos Basin's post- and pre-salt areas. The discovery was made by means of the drilling of well 6-CRT-43-RJS, known as Carimbé, located in Caratinga Field…

Singapore slick an inevitable consequence of being Asia’s gas station

Posted to Far East Maritime (by Greg Knowler) on May 25, 2010

If your port is at the confluence of the busiest sea lanes in the world, if it is the world’s largest refuelling port and the biggest oil storage centre in Asia, there is a lot of crude and bunker fuel floating around. So when there is an accident at sea…

Bharati Shipyard in control of Great Offshore

Posted to Bharati Shipyard in control of Great Offshore (by Joseph Fonseca) on May 17, 2010

The battle for Great Offshore, country’s largest integrated offshore services firm, has finally ended with Bharati Shipyard in total control and ABS shipyard left trying to dilute its share holding in the company. Last week Bharati Shipyard…