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Friday, January 21, 2022

Grand Cayman sea level data

Posted to Gulf Coast hurricane intensity reduction (by Richard LaRosa) on January 26, 2010

MSL monthly averages for Grand Cayman and Settlement Point are available from Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory for 1986 through 1996. Settlement Point is still operating but the data has not been supplied to Proudman's Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level. I don't know how to access the data.

Cameron Supplying X-mas Trees for Petrobras

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on January 21, 2010

After being awarded a $100 million contract for 25 subsea Xmas tress for the Campos Basin by Petrobras in 2008, (deliveries completed in late 2009), Cameron entered into a frame agreement with Petrobras in 2009, expected to be worth approximately $500 million…

Suez Canal

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on May 4, 2010

The Suez Canal is the sea-level waterway from Port Said on the Mediterranean to the city of Suez on the Red Sea. It is owned and maintained by the Suez Canal Authority of Egypt. The canal is 119 miles long. There is generally a very modest current flowing from south to north…

Turkish Straits

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 20, 2010

The Turkish Straits consist of two narrow straits in northwestern Turkey, the Bosporus and the Dardanelles, and the Sea of Marmara that connects them. The Turkish Straits lie between the Black Sea to the east and the Aegean Sea, which is a region of the much larger Mediterranean Sea.

USCG Districts

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on April 6, 2010

The US Coast Guard adopted the concept of geographic districts when it absorbed the US Lighthouse Service in 1939. Previously, it had no formal segmentation of its chain of command based on geography. Rather, the chain of command was grouped around function.

Trireme - dreadnaught of the ancient Mediterranean

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on March 5, 2010

The trireme was utilized as a warship in the Mediterranean Sea from the 7th century BC until the fall of the Roman Republic at about the commencement of the Christian era. No other warship design has survived in service for a comparable period. It was truly the dominant battleship of its day.

Nathaniel Bowditch (1773-1838)

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on February 9, 2010

Born in Salem, Massachusetts on March 26, 1773, Nathaniel Bowditch had little formal education. He left school at age ten to work in his father’s cooperage. He was then indentured as a bookkeeping apprentice to a ship chandler. Through prodigious self-study…

Loss of the Argo Merchant

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on December 15, 2009

On December 15, 1976, the oil tanker Argo Merchant grounded on Middle Rip Shoal in international waters approximately 25 nautical miles southeast of Nantucket Island. The tanker was en route from Venezuela to Boston carrying 7.7 million gallons of No. 6 fuel oil.

Fiber Optics Solutions for Sub-Salt Deep water Subsea Systems

Posted to Brazilian Subsea and Maritime News (by Claudio Paschoa) on December 1, 2009

Fiber optics continues to provide a flexible enabling technology for many areas of future subsea oilfield development. The increasing demand on new sources of O&G, with most shallow water fields being mature, has driven the O&G industry into deep water and ultradeep water fields.

Pirates of the European Union

Posted to On the waterfront (by Emma-Jane Batey) on November 12, 2009

The issue of piracy on the open waves doesn’t seem to be far from the news at the moment. Now, this might be because of what my dad rather gruesomely calls the ‘dog bites baby’ syndrome, when something happens once then every story in the newspaper seems to be about the same issue…

Magnetic poles

Posted to Maritime Musings (by Dennis Bryant) on November 20, 2009

Existence of the north and south magnetic poles was postulated long after magnetic compasses came into widespread use. Prior to that, many people believed that the compass needle was attracted either to a magnetic island in the far north or to the Pole Star (Polaris) itself.

Where to find the blog.

Posted to BitterEndBlog.com (by Richard Rodriguez) on November 12, 2009